Photoshop Basics for Artists 2022 - Class/Homework Thread Part II

Homework submission for Week 6 is now closed.

NOTE: No homework will be accepted beyond the deadline date without significant score penalty (specifically after 12pm on deadline date.)

Great job again everyone! This week’s homework was pure awesomeness."

Scores for this week are listed below (by initials.)
A maximum score of 6 points was available this week.
2 possible points for apple alla prima on easel.
2 possible for bonus perspective fix of original artwork.
2 possible for double super bonus for alla prima apple scan fix.

GM: 0
SS: 5.5
AA: 0
LP: 5.5
DDC: 6
LS: 4
JM: 0
MB: 2
NF: 5.5
RM: 2
SSh: 2
SB: 4
WK: 6

All results will be explained during the intro recap for Week 7 (Thurs., 11/17, 2 PM EST.)

Here you will find all of the information (appropriate links (including Dropbox folder links for homework), notes, reminders, etc.) for Photoshop 101 (Photoshop Basics for Artists) Week Seven.

NOTE: Please respect the work, rights, and privacy of participating artists. You may view the uploaded homework efforts from the class within the Dropbox folder, but you may not download or manipulate their work in any way. Anya and I will be downloading uploaded homework or classwork images when needed/appropriate, but we will never share anyone’s images outside of the class without express permission from the author. All files in the Drobox folders will be deleted at the end of the course. In addition, please know that classes will not be recorded to respect each participant’s learning experience.

If there are files required for the week’s homework, then they will be available in a folder called “WeekX_Resources” in the appropriate week’s folder. You will need to download to files in this folder to complete the week’s homework. However, please be sure not to remove or add anything to this folder.

Here’s a few notes from today’s class:

PS Basics for Artists Week Seven – Blending Modes and More Fixes

Homework Recap

Blending Modes and Styles for Layers (The dynamics of those acetate layers!)

  • Blending mode is an effect you can add to a layer to change how the colors from the selected layer “blend” with colors on lower layers.

Note: Base Layer (Bottom Layer(s)) Blending Layer (Layer with Blending Mode applied)

  • Normal: the color is simply placed on top of the color of the layer below. “Normal” is the default Blending Mode for Photoshop layers. Opaque pixels will cover the pixels directly below them without applying any math or algorithm to them.

  • Dissolve: This mode also does not blend pixels. Dissolve only reveals the pixels below when the layer’s Opacity or Fill is reduced. The pixels below are revealed through a pseudo-random noise dither pattern whose intensity is based on the opacity of the blending layer. Dissolve shows either the blend color or the base color – never a blend of two. No anti-aliasing is used, and the result will look grainy and harsh.

  • Darken: The Darken Blending Mode looks at the luminance values in each RGB channel and displays either the base color or blend color depending on which is darker. This Blending Mode does not blend pixels; it only compares the base and blend colors, and keeps the darkest of the two. If the blend layer and the base layer color are the same, then there is no change. It simple terms it compares the colors of the blending layer and the base layers, and keeps the darker colors.

  • Multiply: This Blending Mode multiplies the luminosity of the base color by the blend color. The resulting color is always a darker color. White produces no change, while the black pixels remain. Multiply is a great Blending Mode for darkening images or adding color to shadows.

  • Color Burn: Named after the photography film development technique of “burning” or overexposing prints to make the colors darker, this blending mode darkens the colors and increases the contrast of the base colors, then blends the colors of the blending layer.

  • Linear burn: decreases the brightness of the base color based on the value of the blend color. The result is darker than Multiply but less saturated than Color Burn. Linear Burn also produces the most contrast in darker colors than any of the other Blending Modes in the “Darken group.”

  • Darker Color: very similar to Darken, and also not blending pixels, it compares the base and blend colors, and keeps the darkest of the two. The difference here is that Darker Color looks at the composite of all the RGB channels, whereas Darken looks at each RGB channel individually to come up with a final blend.

  • Subtract: subtracts the color of the blending layer from the base colors, resulting in a darker color.

  • Lighten: compares both the base and blend colors, and it keeps the lightest of the two. If both colors are the same, then no change is applied. As with the Darken Blending Mode, Lighten looks at the three RGB channels separately when blending the pixels. In simple terms, the base colors and the colors of the blending layer and compared keeps the lighter color.

  • Screen: inverts the base colors and multiplies with the colors of the blending layer. This creates the opposite effect of the Multiply mode. The resulting colors will be brighter than the original colors. Black produces no change as it becomes transparent while the brighter pixels remain. Screen can produce many different levels of brightening depending on the luminosity values of the blend layer, making Screen a great Blending Mode for brightening images or creating highlights.

  • Color dodge: lightens the colors of the base layers and reduces the contrast. This results in saturated mid-tones and blown out highlights…

  • Glow dodge: creates a stronger effect than the Color dodge mode.

  • Linear Dodge (Add): produces similar but stronger results than Screen or Color Dodge. This Blending Mode looks at the color information in each channel and brightens the base color to reflect the blend color by increasing the brightness. Blending with black produces no change. In more simple terms, the mode adds the color information of the base layers and the blending layer. In digital terms, adding color increases the brightness.

  • Lighter Color: very similar to Lighten, and also not blending pixels, it compares the base and blend colors, and it keeps the brightest of the two. The difference is that Lighter Color looks at the composite of all the RGB channels, whereas Lighten looks at each RGB channel to come up with a final blend.

  • Overlay: uses Screen at half strength on colors brighter than 50% gray. And the Multiply at half strength on colors darker than 50% gray. 50% gray itself becomes transparent. Note that “half-strength” does not mean, Opacity at 50%. Another way of thinking about Overlay is by thinking of shifting mid-tones. Dark tones shift the mid-tones to darker colors, and light tones shift the mid-tones to brighter colors. One difference between Overlay and the other Contrast Blending Modes is that it makes its calculations based on the brightness of the colors in the base layer. All of the other Contrast Blending Modes make their calculations based on the brightness of the blend layer.

  • Soft light: very much like Overlay. However, while it also applies either a darkening or lightening effect depending on the luminance values, it does so in a much more subtle way. You can think of Soft Light as a softer version of Overlay without the harsh contrast.

  • Hard light: combines the Multiply and Screen using the brightness values of the Blend layer to make its calculations. Overlay uses the base layer. The results with Hard Light tend to be intense, and in many cases, you will have to reduce the Opacity to get better results. Hard Light sounds like it would have something in common with Soft Light, but it does not. It is much more closely related to Overlay.

  • Vivid Light: You can think of Vivid Light as an extreme version of Overlay and Soft Light. Anything darker than 50% gray is darkened, and anything lighter than 50% gray is lightened.

  • Linear Light: uses a combination Linear Dodge (Add) on lighter pixels and a Linear Burn on darker pixels.

  • Hard Mix: applies the blend by adding the value of each RGB channel of the blend layer to the corresponding RGB channels in the base layer. The resulting image loses a lot of detail, and the colors can only be black, white, or any of the six primary colors: red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, or yellow. The results are extreme, and you will often need to reduce the intensity to get a more pleasing result.

  • Difference: subtracts the colors of the blending layer from the base colors, keeps the resulting value and combines it with the original base colors. More specifically, It uses the difference of the base and blend pixels as the resulting blend. White inverts the colors of the base layer. Black Produces no change, while dark grays apply a slight darkening effect**. This blending mode can be extremely useful for aligning layers with similar content.** When two pixels are the same, the result will turn black.

  • Exclusion : in a process very similar to Difference, blending with white inverts the base color values, while blending with black produces no change. However, Blending with 50% gray produces 50% gray.

  • Subtract: subtracts pixel values from the base layer. This Blending Mode drastically darkens pixels by subtracting brightness. Black has no effect. Only as the blend values get brighter does the result get darker. Subtract produces the opposite effect as Divide.

  • Divide: all colors are turned into a percentage. Blending with the same color results in white because any number divided by itself is 1, or 100%. Black (0%) gives you black because diving by zero is undefined. No change occurs. White has no effect. Only as the blend values get darker does the result get brighter. Dark areas of the blend layer produce bright colors, while the light areas of the blend layer produce a very small change. Divide produces the opposite effect as Subtract.

  • Hue: keeps the blend colors’ hue but preserves the base colors’ luminosity and saturation. Hue will not apply a change if the base layer is a neutral gray. The Hue Blend Mode could be used to change hues in a layer while maintaining the tones and saturation of the original.

  • Saturation: applies the blend colors’ saturation to the base colors’ hue and luminosity (details). Saturation will not apply a change if the base layer is a neutral gray. A black-and-white blend layer will turn the result black-and-white because none of the pixels have saturation.

  • Color: applies both the hue and saturation of the blend colors to the luminosity (details) of the base colors. The Color Blending Mode is ideal for colorizing monochromatic images.

  • Luminosity: applies the luminosity (detail) of the blend colors to the base color’s hue and saturation.

Double/Multi Exposure Photography:

What is Double or Multi-Exposure?

Double exposure is a technique that combines two different exposures or images that are layered on top of each other. The image overlaid is less than full opacity so a bit of both images can be seen producing an almost ghost-like image.

For digital photography, multiple or double exposure can be created in-camera or with editing programs like Photoshop. If you’re using actual film, the photographer would have to expose the same part of the film twice, where the second image is being superimposed on the first one.

Homework: (3 points) Create one double or multi exposure image by using the Blending modes as well as any of the tools that we have covered thus far. The final image itself should be around our usual 5x7” @300ppi. An extra bonus point will be added is there can be a discernable message communicated with the inherent juxtaposition.

Bonus Homework: (4 points) If possible, share a before and after fix to remove unwanted information (usually generated by material topography issues.) While you CAN use any of the smaller targeting tools we have used before (e.g., heal and clone stamp), be sure to try and use a blending mode to do the “heavy lifting.” Also, try and keep the submitted “pre” and “post” image large enough so that the level of fix can be reasonably appreciated.

As always, very much looking forward to your projects!!!

Anyone remember this stuff?

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Yes, but I think it was actually used as a varnish for archival reasons.

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I can’t find the dropbox homework file. Is it here somewhere? Can’t wait to hand in my homework early!

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Hey Lori!!! The folder for the homework is the one above the notes. The folder that takes you to os the homework folder. The only other thing on there at present is the resources folder. Hopefully your early work will be a beacon of inspiration for all! :+1:t2::heart:

Unless you mean an actual “file” for homework use—in which case there isn’t one. :man_shrugging:t2:

Sorry, I guess I’m just not used to being first! Yes I meant folder. silly me.
I’ll get the other done soon. : )

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We didn’t go over the homework from week six at the beginning of class on Thursday. If possible, I’d like to know why I got a 5.5 instead of 6. You realize Warren or Diane will have to contract typhoid fever and drop out of class for me to end up with the top score now, right? :sob:

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:joy::joy::joy: I can’t remember all of her her exact comments but I do remember something about “uneccesarily excessive clone stamping.” :joy:

I’d like to know too…I thought I worked hard on it !!! I thought I discovered a great thing and pulled up both in the same window and magic happened! Also, regarding Nat’s query…How does one know changes when it started in psd and ended as jpg?

Same here! I had a half point deduction.

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Note: Diane nor I will be accepting any Holliday Gift Baskets from Natalie until the class is over.

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Screen Shot 2022-11-23 at 1.38.24 PM

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Ha ha ha ha! Perfect!!!

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Hi Suzanne!

Sorry for my delay, but things are really busy here before the Holiday. The point deduction on your homework was due to the fact that the instructions were not followed for the double bonus. The instruction stated on the site," Do your absolute best to try and salvage what you can from this scan and see if you can get it as close as possible to the “Apple_alla_prima_edited_Classuseonly.jpg”

Upon close inspection, it was clear that you used information from the Apple_alla_prima_edited_Classuseonly.jpg file (which served as the guide file) in a manner that defeated the purpose of the exercise. Remember that participants were explicitly instructed during class not to use content outside of the Alla_Prima_Apple_SCAN_Forclassuseonly!

Here you can see the unique artifacting from Anthony’s Apple_alla_prima_edited_Classuseonly file in your final submission (in red) as well as the color noise from the SCAN file (blue). This clearly demonstrates that the instructions were not followed and that the submission contains content from BOTH files.

Hope this helps---- Happy Thanksgiving!!!

Hi Sarah—

Your homework was great. I was especially impressed with your ability to remove as much noise from the scan as possible. The half-point deduction was only due to the fact that I felt that too much of the apple information had been lost (some of the baby out with the bathwater.) But again, fantastic work on the noise reduction!!!

Hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving!!!

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Yes, I did my best trying to salvage what I could…Then discovered when I opened the edited version in the same window and spot cloned, it helped the work. So, I “did my best to salvage what I could”, following those instructions. But I didn’t layer which is what we were told not to do. Work arounds are still within stated guidelines. Just sayin’

Challenge for Anthony: I would like a demo from Anthony on this exercise, because it was SOOOO HARD. Worked hours on it. Maybe show us how you would have approached it step by step?

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Homework submission for Week 7 is now closed.

NOTE: No homework will be accepted beyond the deadline date without significant score penalty (specifically after 12pm on deadline date.)

Great job again everyone! Super awesome job again!!!."

Scores for this week are listed below (by initials.)
A maximum score of 8 points was available this week.
3 possible points for “double/multi-exposure” image.
1 possible if Anya can “discern meaning” from “double/multi-exposure” image…
4 possible points for “unwanted information” image fix.

GM: 4
SS: 8
AA: 4
LP: 8
DDC: 7
LS: 8
MB: 4
NF: 8
RM: 4
SSh: 4
SB: 7
WK: 8

All results will be explained during the intro recap for Week 8 (Thurs., 12/1, 2 PM EST.)