Complete Shape Replication


I finally completed the Shape Replication Exercise. I started with a very heavy hand, but after getting feedback from Anthony, I think I managed to finish with a lighter hand. All feedback is welcome. @AWaichulis Can I move to the next exercise or is there something that needs reworking? Thanks

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Awesome Richard! Can you post an image so I can see how you did? Thanks—

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Sorry about that! :rofl:

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LOL! No worries–I do that with emails all the time. :joy:

Ok, well, the bounded shape reps (ones in boxes) are very dark in this example, but we spoke about that earlier. The free-form ones, though (on the far right), are fantastic. If you can maintain that type of line quality and value without compromising accuracy moving forward, then you will be fine. If, however, you find that you are compromising one attribute to maintain another, then I would recommend practicing this a few more.

In addition, I want to mention something about enhancers and strengtheners. The program, as it is presented, is a baseline. For practitioners that may be having difficulty in a certain part of the program, we have additional strengtheners to bring the artist up to baseline. However, if some practitioners can demonstrate early success, we make sure they have enough resistance to maximize development by offering “enhancers.” Enhancers are supplemental challenges to push those with early aptitude a bit further. One such set of enhancers for shape reps are the Bargue redux models. They can be found here:

The Bargue redux shape replications introduce a new level of recognition to the observation and replication process. This means that the models up to this point have been more or less non-objective “abstractions,”–BUT the Bargue models introduce objective representation, which may bring about issues of conceptual contamination. For example, when we are working from the abstract shape replication models, it is “easier” to attend to the component parts of the “whole” as it is fairly ambiguous. However, when working from the Bargue eye sheet, let’s say, the practitioner may have a more difficult time attending to the same low-level component pieces as the understanding that the “whole” needs to represent an eye can easily infiltrate or “contaminate” that process. Hopefully, you understand what I mean here.

So if you think that you can maintain the type of line quality that you can see in the free-form reps on your panel on the right, then I would suggest giving the some of the enhancer Bargue redux models a shot (hopefully, you have access to a way to print a transparency!)

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:joy:

I appreciate the detailed feedback and encouragement, much appreciated.

So, I managed to download and print the Bargue Redux plates (the ones in this picture). Should I complete some of the plates or is it recommended that I complete all the plates before moving on to pressure scales? Thanks. This is an exciting challenge :grin:

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I recommend the approach that many take within the contemporary programs bowing from the more “French Academic” training. Start with a simple component one, maybe the eyes, ears, etc. then one of greater complexity, then one of even greater complexity. Remember, you’re not doing any tonal work here—only the delineations.

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That sounds great! I’m on it. Thanks.

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Hello @AWaichulis , I just finished the Waichulis Bargue Redux paintings. The last one really challenged me. Finally! I am done with it. Phew. Thoughts?

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Spectacular Richard! Looks like its about time to hit those painted pressure scales…you feel like you’re ready for it???

Thanks Anthony! I’m ready to go! :grin:

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Nice work Richard!