Line Quality and LoP Shape Replication

I find that one of the most significant issues facing the painter is the consideration of how much paint should be on the brush. Now while different tasks will influence this “ideal” amount significantly—for the majority of tasks I try and maintain an amount that yields a dynamic that I am already quite familiar with—a dynamic experienced with dry media.

Here is a very short video discussing just that idea in regards to the role of line quality within our Language of Painting Shape Replication exercises. Perhaps you will find this helpful towards your own efforts.

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Thanks for sharing this video. I’m currently working on the Shape replication exercise, and I had so many questions. Watching this video answered many of them. I will share my progress soon :slight_smile:

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Awesome! Looking forward to it Richard. :+1:t2:

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I have a quick questions. What do I do when I complete a shape replication and realise that that one detail is not correct? Do I redo that detail or do I redo the whole shape?

In the companion text it says ;" Step 3

When you are finished, lift your clear Shape model sheet from its position and gently place it over your painted shapes. You should be able to realize inconsistencies immediately. Repeat this process until the shapes are replicated accurately." -P36. I wasn’t sure if it meant start over and repeat the whole shape, or the process of placing the clear model sheet over the same attempt after correcting the error detail. Thanks.

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I don’t mind starting over again, but I also just want to make sure that I am not being unnecessarily torturing myself :joy:

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Good question—Corrections can be done either way, but I find that there is a notable increase in confidence in one’s mark making if they lean towards greater context building. What this means is that if you get in a habit of doing more before checking (trusting your marks to inform all subsequent marks) then you may get much more out if the exercise.

HOWEVER—if you find that your accuracy is suffering, start to check sooner—maybe every two blocks, or even one—and build up slowly. The default start here at the academy is to try and finish one column (each sheet has two columns) and THEN check.

I see. I only check once I replicate each square completely. If I find that one detail of that shape/square is a little off, I start that shape over again in a new box (The images in the picture with an x on them are the ones I messed up). And only once I get a shape right, do I move on to the next shape. So, instead of doing this, I can erase the small imperfection using white paint and fix that specific line? Also, am I doing this assignment correctly or am I missing something? Is there anything you recommend revisiting or should I continue on to the third page of shape replications? Thanks

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These are looking good Richard! Your line quality and weight are great—but I would try and get the lines lighter. Consider that, in many contexts, early line work will be absorbed into subsequent paint application. The more pigment in the line work—the more it may influence subsequent applications. It’s a good idea to get on the habit of keeping the application very light!

Again, your lines do have a good, confident-looking quality which is awesome.

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Thank you so much Anthony! I will work on keeping the application very light! Much appreciated.

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