Shadow Box Build

Anthony et al, Good afternoon!

I’d like to build a shadow box before starting my form box work. The plan included on my companion CD is too small to read; zooming in distorts the numbers.

Here is the file, if you’d like to see what I am referring to: https://www.dropbox.com/s/tbyim4d6n3oo2l8/2012_Waichulis_Shadow_Box_Design_Plans1.pdf?dl=0

Is there another version of this document that I could take a look at?

Thank you,
:Sha

PS: The grid stand diagram seems to be readable, for reference: https://www.dropbox.com/s/yjvtqu5pkulco1e/2012_Waichulis_Grid_Stand_Design_Plans1.pdf?dl=0

Sorry about that Sha!!! Let me see if I can grab a better image for you—

Good morning! You’re up early. :slight_smile:

Thank you, and Happy Saturday!

Try this Sha: http://anthonywaichulis.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Waichulis_SHADOW-BOX.pdf

Additionally, if you would like something more simple that would do the job just fine you can cut up a 30x40" piece of black foam-core like this and assemble a perfectly viable shadow box:

http://anthonywaichulis.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Foam_Core_Shadowboxlayoutcomplete-2.pdf

Here is also a great plan for a simple shadow box that even has optional diffuser panels (not necessary of course and I definitely would not use more than one.):

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Excellent, thank you, Anthony! Those both read excellently.

I appreciate it; I might have time to knock out the foam core today. :)))

TTFN!
:sha

Next question: Many of the shadowboxes I’ve seen have a slit in the top to allow light in from above (example here). Is there a recommended way to cut this hole? I’ve seen square, rectangular running for-aft down the center of the box… myriad.

Any opinions either way?

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Great question Sha—I have also seen a great number of variations to how the light is allowed to enter. My only recommendation is that it is done is a way so as to keep the influence of the primary light source as paramount. What I mean by this is, you don’t want the manner of primary light entry portal to diffuse or diminish the light so much that it may become inextricably conflated with any ambient light—thus resulting in light/dark separations that are difficult to parse. Does that make sense?

Yes, perfect sense. Thank you.

My studio has a ton of natural light… a blessing and a curse! :smiley:

I’m adding what I think is a useful Shadow Box solution here from artist @laurie1327249. The “Wine Box” solution:

Laurie writes: "I have always saved my old wooden wine boxes to store art supplies; however, recently I have been using them for small still life set-ups with my art students.

I use two boxes (approximately 13x20 61/2" deep. One I turn upside down so that I have a wooded edge at the bottom and I place the other open box on top to put the still life objects."

These boxes are sturdy and you can attached a clip on light that will hold securely.

I purchased my clip on light on Amazon for $19 (QUANS 5W 5x1W Warm White 19.68inch Clamp Clip on Gooseneck High Power LED Desk Table Light Lamp Ultra Bright Silver) and you can adjust the light source easily by moving the goose neck.” (Link: https://www.amazon.com/QUANS-19-68inch-Gooseneck-Bright-Silver/dp/B00W3GJ6WM/)

Thanks Laurie!